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2.356 Egyptian Sandwich (Lamb, Cheese, Spicy)

-Cycle 2, Item 356-
27 (Tue) December 2011

-Egyptian-
Egyptian Sandwich (Lamb, Cheese, Spicy)

* * * *

at Egyptian Sandwiches

-Itaewon, Seoul-

With Jang HJ, Kim HS, Kim JO, Lee SW

Egyptians may eat a lot of meats wrapped in bread but probably nothing like this. The item was first brought to my attention on Seoul Food on his blog, where it's described succinctly as: "Kinda sorta like Philly cheesesteak." He continues: "I will admit that I was quite inebriated when I dived into this bad boy, but I thought it was kinda awesome. Meat, cheese, and grilled onions. What's there not to like?" (see Seoul Food's entry on Egyptian Sandwich Cart). I concur.

More specifically, the sandwich here consisted of seasoned lamb, along with the aforementioned onions and cheese, all sauteed in oil and stuffed into a hoagie roll and topped in a white yoghurt sauce and spicy chili sauce. Chicken, beef, and vegetable were available in lieu of lamb. The cheese and sauces were optional. 4,000 won for the basic sandwich. 1,000 won with cheese.


In many ways--context, construction, taste and texture, as well as the dubious claim of national origin--I'm reminded of the so-called "Moroccan Sandwich" that I wrote about in a prior post (see 1.085 Moroccan Lamb Sandwich). The key difference is that the latter didn't include cheese but featured a scrambled egg and potato knish-like thing, which together gave the sandwich a rounder flavor and mouthfeel while making it much more distinct than a standard meat-and-bread combination. Both sandwiches involved similar if not identical bread, which was also noted by Seoul Food: "I'm pretty sure this guy uses the same type of baguette roll that the Moroccan dude uses. I gotta find out where they sell these things. They're crispy and chewy and the perfect vehicle for greasy griddle-fried fillings." Ultimately, Seoul Food concludes: "I gotta give the slight edge to the Moroccan dude." I concur, though I would suggest that the edge is more than merely "slight."


Of course, the problem with any street business--beyond hygiene and other quality control issues--is tracking it down on a consistent basis. Alas, the Moroccan truck seems to have disappeared, at least from the Itaewon scene. I haven't seen it in ages. The Egyptian truck is/was on the street in the front of the building where Hollywood Grill is located, a couple blocks east of Hamilton Hotel. I can only hope that the tent and tables, a relatively sophisticated set-up for Itaewon street vendors, is a sign of long term quasi-permanence.

With 9 meals remaining to complete the cycle, I'm finally in the home stretch.

4 comments:

  1. "Alas, the Moroccan truck seems to have disappeared, at least from the Itaewon scene"

    I haven't been to Itaewon in a while, but I sure hope this isn't true.

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  2. I hope so too. Make sure to let me know if you run into it or hear about it elsewhere.

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  3. Just visited my friend for a week and he introduced me to this sandwich. A miracle in my mouth is all I can say! Never have had anything like it before in my life! He told me about the Moroccan Sandwich to but the guy was no where to be found all week. I am mad know because I would kill for the recipe and should of looked closer as he made it.

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  4. well, i think we all need to get used to the idea that the moroccan guy is gone.

    as for the egyptian guy, a set recipe is probably out of the question, but you could come fairly close with sliced lamb in a middle-eastern blend of spices, onions, mushrooms, cheese, soft roll, along with some kind of hot sauce and yoghurt sauce.

    ReplyDelete